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Biggest Challenges of Running a Landscaping Business

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Starting a landscaping business is a significant achievement for gardening lovers, but maintaining one is the more considerable challenge. Every owner will face issues at some point that can get in the way of progress, even if the business came from franchise companies for commercial lawn care. Fortunately, many of these hurdles are fixable.

To grow and maximize profits, contractors and business owners have to overcome these industry challenges:

Competition

Competition exists in every field, but it can even be more stressful for the lawn care industry. Landscaping is an $82 billion industry with minimal barriers to entry. You don’t need a lot of capital to start, nor are there education or licensing requirements to fulfill. It’s no surprise that many aspiring entrepreneurs see it as a worthy investment.

Instead of letting the stress get into your head, treat competition as an opportunity to keep improving your business. Conduct extensive market research and figure out your community’s needs. Identify specific services that are in demand and adjust your offerings accordingly.

One way to outperform your competitors is to be more visible online through Search Engine Optimization (SEO). That will improve your search rankings on Google and connect you to potential customers in your area. You can also leverage social media marketing to reach more people. Active social channels that link to your website can help you showcase your works, bring in customer reviews, and create brand awareness.

Hiring reliable employees

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Recruiting loyal and dependable employees for seasonal positions is another challenge for the landscape. Not to mention, fewer people consider the landscaping industry a rewarding career path.

Develop a flexible recruitment strategy using a mix of traditional and high-tech methods. Post ads on online job boards and social media. Include an employment section on your website where candidates may fill in and submit their applications electronically.

Most landscape contractors target high school and college students who are looking for summer jobs. Coordinate with advisers, counselors, and instructors at local schools and colleges to reach more young workers quickly. Your local government and economic-development agency can also help you scout for potential candidates.

Hang eye-catchy flyers on the walls and doors of your company’s office and around your community. Target frequently visited places such as grocery stores, schools, laundry mats, churches, restaurants, gyms, and gas stations.

Put “Help Wanted” signs with contact details in front of your facility and on company vehicles. ; The back of your business card is also a great way to inform people that you’re always on the lookout for hardworking employees.

Complying with government regulations

In the landscape industry, regulations related to safety, equipment, employment, and others are always changing. It takes a lot of time and energy to keep up, but non-compliance is costly and can tarnish your company’s image.

Joining state and federal landscape associations can help you stay abreast of new ordinances. You can also designate an employee to monitor and share regulatory changes with the rest of the team.

Despite these challenges, a landscaping business is one of the most lucrative options for aspiring entrepreneurs. You can start with a shoestring budget or get a head start by partnering with established franchise companies. Regardless, ensure you’re constantly improving your strategies and putting your market’s pain points at the core of your business.

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